NEWS & EVENTS

Monthly Calendar

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Teen Leadership 6 :30 –7 :30 pm
Special Needs Council 7 –7 :30 pm
Zoning Board 7 :30 –8 pm
CERT Clothing Drive 8 :30 –12 pm
ECO-Patio Grand Opening 10 :30 –11 :30 am
Planning Board 7 :30 –8 pm
Veterans Affairs 5 :30 –6 :30 pm
Shade Tree 7 :30 –8 :30 pm
Zoning Board 7 :30 –8 pm
TLC Annual Car Wash 12 –3 pm
Rec Advisory Board 7 :30 –8 pm
Fire Prevention 7 :30 –8 pm
Transportation Committee 7 :30 –8 pm
Planning Board 7 :30 –8 pm
Board of Health 8 –10 pm
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March 01, 2018

 

MANALAPAN, NJ – The Manalapan Arts Council and Mayor Jack McNaboe are pleased to announce the holding of the 10th annual Manalapan Township photo contest.  The 2018 theme is "These Are Among My Most Favorite Things".   The Contest will be looking for pictures of any scene, object, event, people, activity, etc. that best symbolizes your favorite things. Each year’s contest has been very successful as over 375 photos have been submitted in the past 9 years. 

 

Linda Steele, Contest Co-Chair, explains the contest and theme.  “This year the Photo Contest Committee deliberately chose a very broad theme. Over the years we have selected themes that celebrated life here in Manalapan and identified specific topics to be photographed – such as animals or the Jersey Shore.  Often, we have been rewarded in each contest with very artistic presentations.  This year, the theme allows for a lot of imagination – the subject can be a person, place, pet, food, activity, etc. – the proverbial ‘sky is the limit’. We encourage all Manalapan residents to consider submitting a photo.”  Teresa Erlitz, fellow Contest Co-Chair, went on to explain what they are looking for, “As usual, we want to make it as difficult as possible on our Judges! The judges will be looking for photographic quality and will be incorporating titles and artistic flair in their evaluations. The Judges will be open to all the details in the photograph. We encourage all Manalapan residents to consider submitting a photo and a short caption that describes their photo."

"First of all I want to thank the Manalapan Arts Council for again organizing and selecting the theme for our Annual Photo Contest.  I especially want to recognize the stewardship of our co-chairs - Linda Steele and Teresa Erlitz – who are stepping into new roles.”  Said Mayor Jack McNaboe.  Mayor McNaboe added, “The photos that have been submitted over the years for the Photo Contest have always impressed me and we are always proud as a Township to display and acknowledge the artistic talents of the residents of our town.  I am really looking forward to a new set of wonderful photos!"

The contest is open to all Manalapan residents.  Township residents can only enter one photo.  Photographs must include a brief description (25 words or less) of the photo.   Awards will be given as follows:

Prizes of $100 for 1st Place & $50 for Honorable Mention will be awarded in the following categories:

  • 18 years & over (senior)
  • 17 years & younger (junior)

People's Choice – the photo that receives most votes from the Manalapan Day (June 9th) display will also win a prize of $100.

 

As mentioned, all photos will be on display at the Manalapan Day community event on June 9, 2018 where the special “Peoples Choice” award will be given to the photo that garners the most votes that day from the visiting and judging public.

 

Photographs must be received by 4:30 p.m. on May 18, 2018.  Photographs can be submitted by email to photocontest@mtnj.org (file must be less than 5mb) or dropped off at the Manalapan Township Health Department (photographic prints must not be larger than 5” x 7”).  The full set of rules and the submission form are available online at the Township website – www.mtnj.org – or at the Manalapan Township Health Department. 

Please remember a submission form must accompany the photograph.  Forms are also available on the Township web site or at the Manalapan Township Health Department.

Click here for the submission application

For more information please contact David Richardson in the Health Department at 732-446-8345.

March 05, 2018

It is our absolute pleasure to announce our annual kick off to summer celebration will be on Saturday, June 9th! This year we are excited to present the glamorous Florence LaRue, and the 5th Dimension to take the main stage at 8pm.  We have planned a fireworks extravaganza to light up the skies of Manalapan at the end of the evening. Fun and food make Manalapan Day an all-day event including games, rides, ponies, petting zoo, exhibits, local performance groups, great food vendors, and non-stop entertainment!

Please join us as a Vendor for this wonderful family fun day!  Vendor Application   Rule & Regulations

You can also join us as a Sponsor!    Sponsor Letter   Sponsor Application

Any questions please email info@mtnj.org or call 732-446-8308

May 01, 2018

May is NATIONAL PHYSICAL FITNESS AND SPORTS AWARENESS MONTH

 

 Regular physical activity is good for everyone’s health, and people of all ages and body types can be physically active.  Physical activity is any body movement that works your muscles and requires more energy than resting. Walking, running, dancing, swimming, yoga, and gardening are a few examples of physical activity.  Exercise is a type of physical activity that's planned and structured. Lifting weights, taking an aerobics class, and playing on a sports team are examples of exercise.  Being physically active is one of the best ways to keep your heart and lungs healthy. Following a healthy diet and not smoking are other important ways to keep your heart and lungs healthy.  Many Americans are not active enough. The good news, though, is that even modest amounts of physical activity are good for your health. The more active you are, the more you will benefit.

Being physically active can help by:

  • Increasing your chances of living longer
  • Decreasing your chances of becoming depressed
  • Having stronger muscles and bones
  • Staying at or getting to a healthy weight

Not being physically active can lead to:

  • Heart Disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • High Blood Pressure
  • High Blood Cholesterol
  • Stroke

Types of physical activity

  • Aerobic activities make you breathe harder and make your heart beat faster. Aerobic activities can be moderate or vigorous in their intensity. Vigorous activities take more effort than moderate ones. For moderate activities, you can talk while you do them, but you can't sing. For vigorous activities, you can only say a few words without stopping to catch your breath.
  • Muscle-strengthening activities make your muscles stronger. These include activities like push-ups and lifting weights. It is important to work all the different parts of the body - your legs, hips, back, chest, stomach, shoulders, and arms.
  • Bone-strengthening activities make your bones stronger. Bone strengthening activities, like jumping, are especially important for children and adolescents. These activities produce a force on the bones that promotes bone growth and strength.
  • Balance and stretching activities enhance physical stability and flexibility, which reduces risk of injuries. Examples are gentle stretching, dancing, yoga, martial arts, and t'ai chi.

 

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend about 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week.   It is also recommended to do 30 minutes of exercise for day! This includes: fast walking, dancing, and swimming.  Remember, physical activity is for everyone and everyone can do it!

 

For more information contact the Manalapan Township Health Department:

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Location:
Manalapan Town Hall
120 Route 522 & Taylors Mills Road, Manalapan, NJ  07726

Phone: (732) 446-8345
Fax: (732) 446-1576

May 01, 2018

May is MENTAL HEALTH MONTH

A mental health disorder can be anything from bipolar disorder to ADHD to autism. It can affect people of all different ages and backgrounds. Many individuals are faced with debilitating mental illnesses each year. An important step in treating these individuals is early prevention. Not only are mental illnesses common, they are also very treatable.  Because of this, it is important to take a quick screening so that recovery could start as soon as possible.

 

The Four Stages of Mental Illness

  • Stage One: Mild Symptoms and Warning Signs
    • A person experiencing mild symptoms of the disorder but is still able to function relatively ordinarily. At this stage, someone may seem “off”.
  • Stage Two: Increase in Symptoms and Disruption of Life
  • A person’s symptom’s increase and become stronger. It becomes too difficult to perform in school, at home, or at work normally and a person may be unable to fulfill his or her responsibilities. It is now more obvious that something is wrong.
  • Severity of symptoms increase and many may be occurring at one time. The person may start to feel a loss of control over his or her life.
  • The combination of increased severe symptoms and impairment causes a development of other harmful health conditions potentially causing a crisis situation such as unemployment, hospitalization, homelessness, or incarceration. If untreated, he or she may die an average of twenty-five years early.
  • Stage Three: Symptoms Worsen and Serious Disruption of Life Activities
  • Stage Four: Persistent Symptoms Jeopardize one’s Life

 

Ways of treating an illness:

  • Therapy: Including individual therapy, group therapy, and many other types
  • Medication: Although unable to cure the illness, medication can treat the symptoms
  • Peer Support: Through friends or family
  • Community-Based Services: Including evaluations on your mental health and role in your community, education to empower recovery, case management, and more
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Ways of treating an illness outside of mainstream Western medicine
  • Self-Care: Including exercise and online self-managed programs

 

For more information contact the Manalapan Township Health Department:

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Location:
Manalapan Town Hall
120 Route 522 & Taylors Mills Road, Manalapan, NJ  07726

Phone: (732) 446-8345
Fax: (732) 446-1576

May 01, 2018

May is NATIONAL MELANOMA/SKIN CANCER DETECTION AND PREVENTION  MONTH

 

Skin cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells.  It occurs when unrepaired DNA damage to skin cells (most often caused by ultraviolet radiation from sunshine or tanning beds) triggers mutations, or genetic defects, that lead the skin cells to multiply rapidly and form malignant tumors.  Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. More than 3.5 million skin cancers in over two million people are diagnosed annually.  One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime.   It is also the easiest to cure, if diagnosed and treated early. When allowed to progress, however, skin cancer can result in disfigurement and even death.    Even if you have carefully practiced sun safety all summer, it's important to continue being vigilant about your skin in fall, winter, and beyond. Throughout the year, you should examine your skin head to toe once a month, looking for any suspicious lesions.  Self-exams can help you identify potential skin cancers early, when they can almost always be completely cured.  It is so vital to catch melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. 

Melanoma Warning Signs

Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that becomes cancerous. Melanoma most often appears on the face or the trunk of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the lower legs. In both men and women, melanoma can occur on skin that hasn't been exposed to the sun.

Melanoma can affect people of any skin tone. In people with darker skin tones, melanoma tends to occur on the palms or soles, or under the fingernails or toenails.

Melanoma signs include:

  • A large brownish spot with darker speckles
  • A mole that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
  • A small lesion with an irregular border and portions that appear red, white, blue or blue-black
  • Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips or toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina or anus

 

Tips to lowering your risk of skin cancer

 

  • Stay in the shade, especially during midday hours.
  • Wear clothing that covers your arms and legs.
  • Wear sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Use sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher and both UVA and UVB protection.
  • Avoid indoor tanning.

 

When to see a doctor

 

Make an appointment with your doctor if you notice any changes to your skin that worry you. Not all skin changes are caused by skin cancer.  Your doctor will investigate your skin changes to determine a cause.

 

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Location:
Manalapan Town Hall
120 Route 522 & Taylors Mills Road, Manalapan, NJ  07726

Phone: (732) 446-8345
Fax: (732) 446-1576

May 01, 2018

May is AMERICAN STROKE MONTH

 

Stroke is one of the leading causes of serious, long-term adult disability in the United States. Almost 800,000 strokes occur every year, taking someone’s life about every four minutes. A stroke happens when the blood flow to the brain is cut off when a blood vessel clogs or bursts. You should be able to recognize the following symptoms of a stroke:

 

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm, or leg
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking, or understanding others
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden dizziness, trouble walking, or loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

 

A stroke is an emergency. If you think someone is having a stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical for recovery.

 

Fortunately, there are many ways that you can reduce your risk of having a stroke:

           

  • CONTROL YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE. High blood pressure is the #1 controllable risk factor for stroke. You should check your blood pressure regularly since high blood pressure typically has no symptoms. Lifestyle changes, diet changes, and medication can all help lower blood pressure.

 

  • EAT A HEALTHY DIET. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Eat foods that are high in fiber and low in fat, cholesterol, and salt.

 

  • GET ENOUGH EXERCISE. Exercise can help you maintain a healthy weight and lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels. You should get about 150 minutes of exercise each week.

 

  • MAINTAIN A HEALTHY WEIGHT. Being overweight or obese increases your risk for stroke. Even just losing a few pounds can lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

 

  • DON’T SMOKE. If you do smoke, quit. Cigarette smoking doubles your risk for stroke and damages your heart and blood vessels.

 

  • LIMIT YOUR ALCOHOL USE. Drinking too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure and increase your risk of stroke. Men should limit themselves to no more than two drinks per day and women should limit themselves to only one.

 

  • MANAGE YOUR CHOLESTEROL. Check your cholesterol at least once every five years. High cholesterol levels can cause a stroke.

 

  • MANAGE DIABETES. If you have diabetes, monitor your blood sugar levels carefully. You can manage diabetes through diet, exercise, and medication.

 

  • MANAGE HEART DISEASE. Taking care of heart problems can help prevent stroke. For certain heart conditions, you may need medical treatment or surgery.

 

  • TAKE MEDICATION. You should follow your doctors instructions if you take medication to treat heart disease, high cholesterol, blood pressure, or diabetes.

 

 

For more information contact the Manalapan Township Health Department:

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Location:
Manalapan Town Hall
120 Route 522 & Taylors Mills Road, Manalapan, NJ  07726

Phone: (732) 446-8345
Fax: (732) 446-1576

May 01, 2018

Grass may cause injuries!

 

For most people, mowing the lawn is either a chore or a relaxing time to work outdoors. For about 70,000 people this year, mowing the lawn will turn into a brush with death or serious injury. The statistics, from the U.S. Consumer Products Safety Commission, are harrowing: Each year 800 children are run over by riding mowers or small tractors; 75 people are killed, and 20,000 injured; one in five deaths involves a child.  Let’s face it, lawnmowers are dangerous tools, but they are so common that people may not treat them seriously. Underneath the mower deck is a steel cutting blade spinning at more than 2000 revolutions per minute. Depending on its length, the blade tip may be moving at 200 mph.  An injury from contacting the blade is not the only danger from a running mower. The blade speed can turn rocks, stick, or other debris into deadly projectiles. And don’t forget, the mower engine itself gets hot enough to ignite gasoline or cause third-degree burns, the most serious kind. For riding mowers, other dangers include tipping the mower over on a hill, losing control of the mower, or accidentally backing over an object or person.

Here are safety tips when mowing the lawn

  • Make sure your mower is in good condition. Look it over before each use; when something breaks, have it repaired. A poorly running mower may lead the operator to take unnecessary risks.
  • Dress appropriately. Don’t mow barefoot or in flip-flops. Wear good shoes that provide traction, safety glasses, and close fitting clothes that can’t be caught in a gear or engine.
  • Never run the mower without its safety equipment. Most walk-behind mowers come with a dead-man switch, which shuts the mower off and applies a blade brake when the operator releases the handle. Don’t remove this switch or tie it down. Mowers also come with a guard on the discharge chute. This guard, usually plastic, directs the mower discharge down into the ground. When the mower strikes a rock, the chute can keep it from breaking a window or striking a person. If the chute clogs while you are mowing, shut the mower off and use a stick to clear it. Then, raise the mower deck or wait until the grass dries out before continuing. Never tie the chute up. If you need to fill up the gas tank, shut off the mower and let it cool before filling the tank. Take a break and get some water before filling; if you’ve run the tank dry, you’ll need it.
  • Before you mow, check the lawn for loose objects that could turn into a projectile if struck. When mowing a slope with a riding mower, mow up and down the slope to prevent tipping over. If you are using a walk-behind, mow across the slope to avoid slipping under the mower
  • Look out for others, especially children. Make sure children, pets, and others are a safe distance from the mower. Children can unexpectedly dart into the mowing path or fail to move when the mower is backing up toward them.
  • Use safety glasses when mowing grass.  Bits of grass, dirt, leaves and other objects can be discharged from the mower, rebound off adjacent buildings, and fences and hit your face.  Glasses also protect your eyes on windy days.  Carry snug-fitting leather gloves for the purpose of removing plugged grass or making adjustments to the mower. 
  • Always mow when grass is dry.  Wet grass can cause your feet to slip.  The mower can also slip in wet conditions.  If you slip, your feet and legs can come in contact with the mower’s blades, causing injury or loss of limbs.  Wet grass can also clog the mower!
  • Never leave the mower unattended while the engine is running!

 

For more information contact the Manalapan Township Health Department:

Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Location:
Manalapan Town Hall
120 Route 522 & Taylors Mills Road, Manalapan, NJ  07726

Phone: (732) 446-8345
Fax: (732) 446-1576

May 07, 2018

Join Mayor Jack McNaboe, the Township Committee and the Manalapink Committee to Paint the Town Pink! 

Each May, towns in Monmouth and Ocean counties join Meridian Health’s Paint the Town Pink effort to raise awareness of the importance of an annual mammography.

Manalapan Township will be Manalapink for the month of May 2018 in an effort to remind women to get their annual mammograms, the best defense against breast cancer.

Business Owners…If you are interested in getting involved and hosting a Pink Event in the month of May please contact info@mtnj.org. We will put a list of events and participating businesses on our website.

Residents of Manalapink…It’s Time to Pink Your Houses! Support the Importance of Mammography by Decorating Your House Pink. Email info@mtnj.org with your pink houses and we will post it on the Manalapan Township facebook page. Each participating home will receive a “Paint the Town Pink” Certificate from the Mayor.

Support from our businesses and community volunteers is what makes Paint the Town Pink so successful.

 

Thank you to our participating businesses:

Arthur Murray Dance Centers of Central New Jersey

Bridges at St. Thomas More Nursery School

Destination Wellness Center

Fix Your Phone and More

Goldfish Swim School

Heritage Village at Manalapan

Manalapan Fitness & Wellness

Navicore Solutions

Pinot’s Palette

The Manalapan App

Showerman

TLC PEDIATRICS

Uniglicht, Helman & Bloom, LLP

By participating in the “Paint the Town Pink” campaign each town helps to raise awareness for the importance of early detection of breast cancer, and encourages community involvement. Paint the Town Pink is a fantastic way for the whole community to come together in support of breast cancer prevention and awareness.

There are so many ways to Paint the Town Pink and everyone can be involved whether you are an individual, business, group of friends, company, school or club.
 
Join us for the month of May in Manalapink!

May 09, 2018

Manalapink Is In Full Swing!

Each May, towns in Monmouth and Ocean counties join Meridian Health’s Paint the Town Pink effort to raise awareness of the importance of an annual mammography.

See below for information on Manalapink Events in May at Pinot’s Palette and Manalapan Fitness & Wellness

Thank you to our Business Owners who are Painting the Town Pink

Support from our businesses and community volunteers is what makes

Paint the Town Pink so successful.

 

Arthur Murray Dance Centers of Central New Jersey

Bridges at St. Thomas More Nursery School

Destination Wellness Center

Fix Your Phone and More

Goldfish Swim School

Heritage Village at Manalapan

Manalapan Fitness & Wellness

Navicore Solutions

Pinot’s Palette

The Manalapan App

Showerman

TLC PEDIATRICS

Uniglicht, Helman & Bloom, LLP

 

Pink Events Scheduled for May

Thank you to Pinot’s Palette for hosting a great event on May 16th.  

Manalapan Fitness & Wellness is holding a Special Class Schedule on Saturday May 19th.  See flyer for details or call 732-851-7288

Arthur Murrary Dance Studio will be holding dance classes for the rest of the month. See flyer for Details or email www.amdancemanalapan.com  

Business Owners…If you are interested in getting involved and hosting a Pink Event in the month of May please contact info@mtnj.org. We will list events and participating businesses on our website.

Residents of Manalapink…It’s Time to Pink Your Houses! Support the Importance of Mammography by Decorating Your House Pink. Email info@mtnj.org with your pink houses and we will post it on the Manalapan Township facebook page. Each participating home will receive a “Paint the Town Pink” Certificate from the Mayor.

By participating in the “Paint the Town Pink” campaign each town helps to raise awareness for the importance of early detection of breast cancer, and encourages community involvement. Paint the Town Pink is a fantastic way for the whole community to come together in support of breast cancer prevention and awareness.

 
There are so many ways to Paint the Town Pink and everyone can be involved whether you are an individual, business, group of friends, company, school or club.
 
Join us for the month of May in Manalapink!

May 17, 2018

On Saturday, April 28, 2018, the Manalapan-Englishtown Community Alliance to Prevent Alcoholism and Drug Abuse held its 4th annual Project ZERO 5K Fun Run. The event was held at the Manalapan Recreation Center. The event was a great culmination to a month long project of raising awareness about alcoholism and drug abuse and the Project ZERO campaign.

Almost 200 people were on site for the Run. Distinguished guests in attendance included Manalapan Mayor Jack McNaboe, Manalapan Deputy Mayor Susan Cohen, and Manalapan Committeemen and Committeewomen David Kane, Mary Ann Musich and Kevin Uniglicht. Also in attendance was Manalapan High School Principal Dr. Adam Angelozzi and local running coach Bob Andrews. Community sponsors included Platinum level sponsors Dynasty Advisors, Englishtown Auction and Suez Water, Gold Sponsors Wegmans, Manalapan Diner, and Precision Tech Home Services and Silver Sponsors Eli and Susan Cohen. Additional support was provided by Arrow Pharmacy, Netcost Market, Manalapan Fitness and Wellness, Superior Home Team, and DJ services from Extravagant Entertainment.

Awards were given to the top finishers in four (4) categories. The runners with the best time for men was Srini Dugginini, women was Michelle Sullivan, boys, 14 and under was Rowan Cassidy and girls, 14 and under, was a tie between Jessica Abbott and Ava Wilmot.

The mission of the Community Alliance is to meet the need for comprehensive alcohol and drug abuse awareness planning and programming to create community-level change in Manalapan Township and Englishtown Borough. For more information on the Alliance or Project ZERO or to become part of the Alliance, please contact the Manalapan Health Department at 732-446-8345 or health@mtnj.org.

May 18, 2018

Monmouth County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon is reminding residents that the Primary Election is on June 5, 2018 and that early voting is possible.

“Voting by Mail is an available option for all registered voters,” said Hanlon. “Any registered voter can vote by mail for any reason, and every valid vote cast by mail will be included in the election results. Residents do not need an excuse to vote by mail and they do not have to worry that their vote will not be counted.”                                                                                      

Vote by Mail ballots for the June 5 Primary Election are now available.

Voters can complete a Vote by Mail application, which can be obtained from the County Clerk's Elections website at www.MonmouthCountyVotes.com or by downloading the free Monmouth County Votes Mobile App. Voters can obtain an application in person by visiting the County Clerk’s Elections Office at 300 Halls Mill Road in Freehold or the Municipal Clerk of their hometown.

Applications to Vote by Mail that are sent by U.S. Mail must be received by the County Clerk’s Elections Office seven days before an election. For the June 5 Primary Election, that date is Tuesday, May 29.

Voters may also apply in person at the County Clerk’s Elections Office located at 300 Halls Mill Road in Freehold up until 3 p.m. the day before the election. Simple instructions for completing and returning vote by mail ballots are included in the ballot package.

Voters with additional questions about Voting by Mail should call the County Clerk’s Election Division at 732-431-7790 or email ClerkofElections@co.monmouth.nj.us